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Writing Tips – Writing Children’s Stories

I’ve written quite a lot of tips for writers over the last few months, and it occurred to me that they are all pointed towards those who write exclusively for adults. In realising this, I decided to put my researching cap on and dig up some tips for those of us writers who would like to focus their craft on writing for children. You can find parts two and three of this series here and here.

Decide on an Age Range
Narrowing down your audience will help you to decide how complicated the story and characters should be. It can also help you to decide what themes and subjects you may or may not want to include in your story.

Know Your Readers
Research what types of children’s books are most popular and read any and all books in your chosen age range that you can because this can help you to get into the right headspace to write for that particular demographic.

Remember
Think of your own childhood and about how you thought and felt about the world back then (no matter how many centuries ago that may have been). Also, think about the types of books and stories you read or had read to you. The great thing about writing for children is that everybody was one at some point and so we all have experiences of which other kids can relate.

Kids Aren’t Dumb
Try not to dumb things down too much. Children are generally quite smart, and as long as you use a vernacular that is clear and that the words you chose aren’t archaic or too over the top, then they’ll get the gist, while at the same time having the opportunity to learn any words they don’t understand and grow their vocabulary.

Good Vs. Evil
In children’s fiction, you will notice that the bad guy never wins and the good guy always comes out the victor, which can help to build a positive outlook on the world and help to instil a better understanding of the concept of right and wrong.

As always, thank you for reading my words, your time is appreciated.

Until next time,

George

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